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DMT

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Acacia – Spiritual Rebirth

Excerpt from The Psychedelic Tree of Life by Richard Merrick

The ancient Egyptian goddess Lusaaset was associated with the acacia tree known as the Tree of Life to ancient Egyptians. More specifically, she was associated with the oldest known acacia tree at the time, which was situated just north of Heliopolis, Egypt, in the famous Garden of Heliopolis.

It is important to note that all species of acacia are known to be hallucinogenic, either in their bark, roots, leaves or fruit, due to the natural production of DiMethylTryptamine or DMT. In particular, acacia trees were used by the ancient Egyptians to make a hallucinogenic wine. The Egyptians called this wine Yrp, which when consumed during sacred ceremonies, caused the appearance of Lusaaset, “the great one who comes forth.”


DMT: The Spirit Molecule

In 1990, I began the first new human research with psychedelic, or hallucinogenic, drugs in the United States in over 20 years. These studies investigated the effects of N,N-dimethyltryptamine, or DMT, an extremely short-acting and powerful psychedelic. During the project's five years, I administered approximately 400 doses of DMT to 60 human volunteers. This research took place at the University of New Mexico's School of Medicine in Albuquerque, where I was tenured Associate Professor of Psychiatry.
I was drawn to DMT because of its presence in all of our bodies. Perhaps excessive DMT production, coming from the mysterious pineal gland, was involved in naturally occurring "psychedelic" states. These might include birth, death and near-death, psychosis, and mystical experiences. Only later, while the study was well under way, did I also begin considering DMT's role in the "alien abduction" experience.
—Dr. Rick Strassman [1]

Laura Lee interviews Rick Strassman

Youtube.com

Posted by theduderinok — September 24, 2007
Laura Lee[2] interviews Dr. Rick Strassman.[1] Rick Strassman was born in Los Angeles, California in 1952. He attended public schools in southern California's San Fernando Valley, and graduated from Ulysses S. Grant High School in Van Nuys in 1969. As an undergraduate, he majored in zoology at Pomona College in Claremont California for two years before transferring to Stanford University, where he graduated with departmental honors in biological sciences in 1973. During summers in college he worked for RedKen Laboratories, developing cosmetics and a line of hair dyes, and also performed laboratory research at Stanford, on the development of the chicken embryo's nervous system. He attended the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in the Bronx, New York, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1977.

Dr. Strassman took his internship and general psychiatry residency at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center in Sacramento, and received the Sandoz Award for outstanding graduating resident in 1981. After graduating, he worked for a year in Fairbanks, Alaska in community mental health and private psychiatric practice. From 1982-1983, he obtained fellowship training in clinical psychopharmacology research at the University of California, San Diego's Veteran's Administration Medical Center. He then served on the clinical faculty in the department of psychiatry at UC Davis Medical Center, before taking a full-time academic position in the department of psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in Albuquerque in 1984.

At UNM, Dr. Strassman performed clinical research investigating the function of the pineal hormone melatonin in which his research group documented the first known role of melatonin in humans. He also began the first new US government approved and funded clinical research with psychedelic drugs in over twenty years. Before leaving the University in 1995, he attained the rank of tenured Associate Professor of Psychiatry, and received the UNM General Clinical Research Center's Research Scientist Award.

In 1984, he received lay ordination in a Western Buddhist order, and co-founded, and for several years administered, a lay Buddhist meditation group associated with the same order. Dr. Strassman underwent a four-year personal psychoanalysis in New Mexico between 1986 and 1990.

He has published nearly thirty peer-reviewed scientific papers, and has served as a reviewer for several psychiatric research journals. He has been a consultant to the US Food and Drug Administration, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Veteran's Administration Hospitals, Social Security Administration, and other state and local agencies.

From 1996 to 2000, while living in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Dr. Strassman worked in community mental health centers for Washington State in Bellingham and Port Townsend. For the next four years, he had a solo private practice in Taos, New Mexico. After two years working on the edge of the Navajo Reservation in Gallup NM, he returned to northern New Mexico in 2006, and works at a mental health center in Espanola.

He currently is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.


Source http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAqz-xYCD2A&NR=1

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Dr. Rick Strassman, RickStrassman.com (http://www.rickstrassman.com/)
  2. Laura Lee Talk Radio, “musing upon those age-old questions -- Who are we? Where did we come from? Where are we going? What are we doing here, anyway? We do so by inviting researchers in an eclectic range of fields – consciousness studies, wisdom traditions, new theories in all the sciences, ancient mysteries, the unexplained, and the just plain fascinating”, (http://www.lauralee.com)